Posts Tagged ‘ perioral dermatitis ’

Is Your Make-up Bag Ruining Your Skin?

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A woman’s make-up bag is the cornerstone of handling the ‘no-time’ trend – whether its about finishing lipstick application ‘dans la tube’ or transitioning from a day-to-nighttime look in the office loos.  However its important to manage this vital toolkit wisely, especially if prone to problem skin. Think about an item like a compact foundation – incredibly convenient for touch-ups, but that applicator is in constant contact with both hands (which may, or may not be clean) and face (oily t-zone, anyone?), so will rapidly become dirty and a breeding ground for bacteria.

 

There are some key steps to avoiding skin issues due to the murky depths of your make-up bag:

1)    Wash brushes once a week in gentle shampoo to avoid the harbouring of acne-promoting bacteria.

2)    If using a compact foundation, be scrupulous about sponge hygiene. There is nothing ickier than a sponge in need of a bath.These are breeding grounds for bugs, so wash regularly, allow to dry thoroughly and replace frequently.

3)    Choose products that are non-comedogenic, especially if looking for longlasting products to survive the full work day. I see a lot of patients with a condition called perioral dermatitis – red bumps around the mouth that look like acne – and their cosmetics almost invariably play a role in this annoying and frequently recurrent disease.

Besides: if your make-up promotes blemishes, you will end up spending more and more time covering up your skin in the morning – a rather futile spiral.

4)    Avoid putting fingers into a jar of cream, however indulgent that might feel. Use a clean spatula to decant product hygienically.

5)    NEVER use saliva to wet make-up brushes or correct make-up mishaps. The mouth is a dirty, dirty cavity.

6)    Don’t borrow or lend make-up, especially eye products. Conjunctivitis is highly contagious and leads to a red, sticky eye (not attractive).

7)    Finally, pay attention to the physical properties of your make-up. Unfortunately many cosmetics don’t have an expiry date. Liquid foundations and mascara have the shortest shelf-life – they should be replaced after as little as 3 months. If a foundation changes texture or a mascara acquires an unusual odour, it’s time to bin it. Bacteria can colonise products and the preservatives might not be work quite as well as they did when you first opened it – so to reduce this risk by seeking out products in a pump, rather than in a pot or open-necked bottle.

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Q:When is acne not acne? A: When it’s perioral dermatitis

I’ve had a cluster of patients presenting with a troublesome facial eruption that’s been mislabelled and thought I’d blog about it because it’s very pleasing to sort and responds rapidly to correct treatment – woo-hoo!

So the common scenario is a female (like melasma, only about 10% of sufferers are men) who has spots near the mouth – within the nose-to-mouth creases and around the chin.

This has a very classic appearance – lots of tiny bumps that look the same, often joining up – but they tend to spare the skin directly next to the lip edge. The skin may be dry and flakey. The bumps on the chin are what tend to lead to the misdiagnosis of acne, as it bears similarity to the distribution of adult female-pattern acne. It can also appear around the eyes (and is then termed periorificial dermatitis) and if severe, spread onto the cheeks. Importantly, clogged pores or comedones are not a feature; this is one of the key features that distinguishes it from acne.

No-one really knows what causes this annoying problem – but the ‘wrong’ type of skin care aggravates it and topical steroids, especially the stronger variants are a common trigger.

When someone presents with this, the first thing I do is to suspend the current skincare regime (and frequently impose a make-up cull). A non-comedogenic regime is the order of the day (I know…I sound like a broken record). We have an excellent choice of soothing, non-clogging products to choose from, courtesy of French pharmacy brands like Bioderma and La Roche Posay and sometimes this will be enough to solve the problem. If topical steroids are the cause, occasionally things get worse before they get better, but stopping them is essential so stick at it.

More severe cases will benefit from prescription medication – my preferred approach is topical (azelaic acid 15-20%) and oral tetracyclines. Usually treatment for 6-8 weeks will sort things out. So satisfying.

A good skin care regime to try if you suffer from perioral dermatitis is as follows  :

Cleanse : La Roche Posay Physiological Cleansing Gel (one of my all-time favourites, non-foaming but effective at removing make-up)

Treatment product – if using a prescription product like Finacea (15% azelaic acid) apply it now, to clean skin morning and night.

Moisturise : Bioderma Sebium Hydra ( a lightweight non-clogging moisturiser for oily skin that’s dry or irritated)

Protect : Obagi Nu Derm Sunshield SPF 50 (lightweight matte finish, excellent physical block without the whitish cast)

Image : courtesy of http://www.drumd.com/